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Rossiter’s BAM Test Results

As many, if not all, of you know, Ryan Rossiter participated in the Portsmouth Invitational Tournament this past weekend. The P.I.T is a chance for some of the nations top seniors to perform in front of hundreds of domestic and international scouts in hopes of beginning a professional basketball career. While game stats and results are commonly discussed, scouts also have the chance to evaluate players based on a series of athletic tests.

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Athletic testing is most commonly associated with the NFL Draft when analysts spend countless weeks discussing a players 40 time, bench reps, vertical and other athletic measurements in an attempt to assess a players raw athletic talent. The BAM test, basic athletic measurement, is basketball’s version of these NFL analytics. Athletes are assessed in a series of drills and measurements to test things ranging from wing span to agility. Here is a breakdown of Ryan Rossiter’s test and a description of the various drills.

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Reach:

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106.5″

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Reach is the measurement of how high a player can reach while standing flat on the floor. Reach is generally measured by having a player stand against a wall and reaching as high as they can. In the case of Ryan this means that he can touch a height of 8′ 10.5″ while standing flat on the ground. The average at the NBA 2008 pre-draft camp was 8′ 8″.

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Wingspan:

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84″

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Wingspan is measured by having a player fully extend his arms out to each side and taking the measurement of length from fingertip on his left hand to fingertip on his right. A large wingspan is seen as a great benefit to a players defense, allowing him to block more shots, get to more rebounds, and steal passes. In Ryan’s case he has a wingspan of 7′. The average at the NBA 2008 pre-draft camp was 6’10.5″.

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Vertical Jump:

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23.5″

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Vertical jump measures exactly what it sounds like, a players jumping ability. The measurement is commonly determined by first measuring a players reach. Once reach is determined the player is asked to jump from a standing position. The height of the jump is subtracted from the height of the reach to determine the amount of height gained by the player through his leap. In Ryan’s case he can jump 23.5″ from a standing position, meaning he can reach a height of 10′ 10″ by jumping (106.5″ + 23.5″). The NBA average is 28″ according to ESPN.

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3/4 Court Sprint:

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3.54 seconds

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This test measures an athlete’s speed running up and down the court, specifically it measures the time it takes an athlete to run 75′, or 3/4 of the court (baseline to opposite free throw line).

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Pro Agility:

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4.53 seconds

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The Pro Agility test measures an athletes, surprise, agility. The drill is setup with three cones being setup in a line, all 15 feet apart. The athlete starts at the center cone and runs either to his left or right. Once he reaches the outside cone, the player must touch the floor and change direction, heading to the farthest cone. Once arriving the athlete once again touches the floor and concludes the drill by sprinting past the center cone. The swiftness in which a player can reach the cone and change direction gives evaluators a sense of the players agility.

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Lane Agility Drill:

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12.58 seconds

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The lane agility drill tests a players body control, speed, and ability to change direction. The drill is setup with 3 cones along the baseline, total width of 16 ft, and 3 cones along the foul line, also 16 ft across. Cones are evenly spaced. The athlete starts at the right cone on the foul line and runs towards the baseline. The athlete then side shuffles across the baseline until he reaches the last cone, at which point he back peddles to the foul line. Once he reaches the foul line the athlete side shuffles to the start line. Once he reaches the start line the athlete reverses direction and side shuffles to the end of the foul line. The athlete then sprints to the baseline. Once he reaches the baseline he side shuffles across the baseline to the last cone, at which point he back peddles to the foul line/ finish line. Through the entire drill the athlete should be facing the baseline. Goal scores for guards is between 10.2-10.9 seconds, forwards 11.0-11.4 seconds, and centers 11.5-12.3 seconds.

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It is important to note that these drills are not the final determination of a players skill. It simply measures raw athletic ability. Many athletes, through pure passion and hard work, are capable of honing their skills and are able to overcome shortcomings that might appear in these tests. A great example of Kevin Durant, the number 2 overall pick in the 2007 draft, ranked 78th out of 80 prospects when he went through pre-draft testing. Yes, that is the same Kevin Durant who is averaging 27.8 ppg this season for the Oklahoma City Thunder, has a career average of 25.9 ppg, and is widely considered one of the best young players in the NBA. The moral, these tests are but one measure of a player, but in no way are the final word on their future success.

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